Did Fanon defend violence?

Decolonization is the veritable creation of new men. But this creation owes nothing of its legitimacy to any supernatural power; the “thing” which has been colonized becomes man during the same process by which it frees itself (Fanon 1963: 36-37). Frantz Fanon’s approach to violence and its effects on the individual is uniquely guided by his lived experience. Fanon was born and raised as a colonial subject in the Antilles. He then undertook medical school and psychiatric training in France. Fanon was later an employed psychiatrist in Algeria, where he later eventually joined the revolution against the French. Fanon’s outlines … Continue reading

Putting Frantz Fanon in context

Frantz Fanon (1925-1961) was a Martinican psychiatrist and political theorist. He is famous for his work which theorises colonialism and violent revolution. Crucial to an understanding of Frantz Fanon’s theoretical work, is an understanding of his very unique personal circumstances. In this short piece, I will give a brief account of Fanon’s life and writing. Fanon was born 1925 in Fort-de-France, the capital city of the French colony of Martinique. He was born into a middle class family, with a public servant father and working mother. Fanon was privileged to be educated in a good school under the tutelage of … Continue reading

Hegel Contra Rorty

Hegel Colour

Hegel and the Limitations of Liberal Irony   Hegel’s name appears again and again in Richard Rorty’s texts. As Tom Rockmore has pointed out, Hegel is a constant point of reference for him.[1] Hegel is cited as an important influence on Rorty’s earliest conception of how philosophy might be conducted, and how it might relate to his desire to change the world, and not merely interpret it. The fullest expression of this debt comes in the following well-known passage from an autobiographical piece from 1992: I have spent 40 years looking for a coherent and convincing way of formulating my … Continue reading