Where to start with Adam Curtis

new-adam-curtis-documentary-hypernormalisation

A friend asked me where they should start with Adam Curtis. It’s a good question. Curtis has been making films since the early 1980s and really came into his own in the 1990s and 2000s. His latest films Bitter Lake (2015) and HyperNormalisation (2016) constitute a break with the past insofar as he has taken his style to its end. What follows next may be a great decline, or it could be a radical new phase in his work. But let’s get back to the question. The latest films may be hard-going for newcomers to the Curtis style. So I’m going to list my … Continue reading

Oscar Wilde: The Soul of Man under Socialism

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The chief advantage that would result from the establishment of Socialism is, undoubtedly, the fact that Socialism would relieve us from that sordid necessity of living for others which, in the present condition of things, presses so hardly upon almost everybody. In fact, scarcely anyone at all escapes. Now and then, in the course of the century, a great man of science, like Darwin; a great poet, like Keats; a fine critical spirit, like M. Renan; a supreme artist, like Flaubert, has been able to isolate himself, to keep himself out of reach of the clamorous claims of others, to … Continue reading

Bukowski: Poetry for the damned

If we turn to the post-Beat scene of writing from the American West Coast we find many noteworthy literary creatures. The poetry of Charles Bukowski stands in contrast to Houellebecq’s nihilism. Bukowski’s dirty realism pulsates with the same themes as Houellebecq albeit with much more in the way of exuberance. He doesn’t so much languish in complacent affluence as live and breathe the filthier side of life. Bukowski remains an essentially American writer in his unabashed individualism, which serves to complement the reservoir of squalor and misanthropy in his prose. He has no coherent social message to convey only defiant … Continue reading